Kilimani Sesame benefits Tanzanian children

January 29, 2016

"We are pleased that researchers at an esteemed academic institution have found evidence of the impact of this media intervention." said Dr. Charlotte Cole, Vice President of International Education, Research, and Outreach at Sesame Workshop. "Children learn best when learning opportunities match their own daily life experiences. Kiilmani Sesame, which was developed by a team of Tanzanian educators and producers, provides images and content that features an environment familiar to its viewers and imparts age-appropriate messages - such as malaria prevention information - that are critical to children living in the country."

"This was an exciting opportunity to see how media can have a great impact," described Dr. Dina L.G. Borzekowski, an Associate Professor with the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Department of Health, Behavior and Society. She continued, "Despite lacking basic resources such as household water and electricity, children in this study benefited from the culturally-relevant and age-appropriate books, radio and video. Sesame Workshop demonstrates how media can best be used engage and motivate young children. This intervention offers a powerful, educational foundation to help Tanzanian children reach their highest potential."

The full findings will be available in the Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, published by Elsevier, next month.

Source: Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health