Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe urges men to take larger role in HIV prevention

March 17, 2016

Dr. Gilmore recruited a team of investigators from across the Harvard University landscape, and also from industry, to tackle the problem of developing new drugs to treat these infections. Massachusetts General Hospital scientists and physicians Drs. Eleftherios Mylonakis, Fred Ausubel, and David Hooper are pursuing new strategies for discovering and testing drugs using model systems. Harvard Medical School professors Drs. Suzanne Walker and Roberto Kolter are using high-throughput robotics to identify potential drugs that target the bacterial cell surface, and its organization. Dr. Kolter and Harvard Faculty of Arts and Science professor Dr. Richard Losick are exploring new approaches for disorganizing bacterial biofilms, making the microbes easier to treat with new and existing antibiotics. Dr. Keeta Gilmore is responsible for coordinating the moving parts, and for cultivating an atmosphere that promotes synergy between projects. This group converges twice monthly at the Mass. Eye and Ear to discuss progress and to coordinate activities.

According to Dr. Gilmore, early efforts stemming originally from the Walker lab and involving most of the collaborators have already turned up one promising lead compound that is in its second generation. He hopes the five-year project will generate between five and ten promising and tested new compounds for fighting multidrug-resistant infection caused by staph and related microbes including the highly challenging vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. A group consisting of Drs. Jared Silverman (Cubist Pharmaceuticals, Inc.), Steve Projan (MedImmune, LLC), Chris T. Walsh (HMS), and Nathanael Grey (HMS), who are highly familiar with the process of moving new drugs from the bench to bedside, will be advising the Harvard-wide collaborative team.

Source: Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary